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Type 2 diabetes can be a 'devastating diagnosis' says expert

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Diabetes occurs when there’s not enough insulin in the body to absorb blood sugar, leaving levels to run rampant. Fortunately, certain foods have anti-diabetic effects that can send high blood sugar levels into remission. Strawberries, tab tenuate in particular, contain a group of complex antioxidants touted for their lowering effects on blood glucose. A number of studies have proven that the fruit can also significantly lower the risk of diabetes.

The carbohydrate in strawberries is sometimes associated with subtle elevations in blood sugar levels, but other nutrients in the fruit help minimise these increases.

The fruit is rich in anthocyanin, a subset of the group of chemicals called flavonoids which are particularly healthy for the brain and heart.

The molecules, which give the fruit its red colour, may be responsible for a decrease in blood sugar levels.

Alongside anthocyanin, however, other plant chemicals such as ellagic acid and ellagitannins also have lowering effects on blood glucose, according to research published in the “Journal of Medicine Food”.

READ MORE: Diabetes: The cancer-fighting herb that quickly slashes blood sugar levels by 25 percent

Academics claim strawberries benefit blood sugar by enhancing insulin sensitivity and improving glucose clearance from the blood.

The Diabetes Self-Management website states that eating around 37 strawberries daily could significantly lower the risk of diabetes complications.

In one study published in the Journal Food and Function in 2016, researchers studied the lowering effects on the blood sugar of 14 overweight individuals.

The clinical trials delivered strawberry beverages at one of three different time points, including two hours before a standard meal, with the meal of two hours after the meal.

Blood samples were thereafter collected over a 10-hour period.

Findings suggested that eating strawberries could help reduce blood sugar levels and inflammation when consumed within two hours of a meal.

The researchers wrote: “The study results showed a significant reduction in postprandial glucose when strawberry was consumed before the meal compared to having the strawberry drinking with the meal.

“Consuming strawberries before and after the meal attenuated postprandial glucose without additional insulin, suggesting improved insulin sensitivity.

“This study provides data suggesting that strawberries have a role in glycemic control and attenuating the pro-inflammatory effect of a modern diet.

“There may be particular advantages when strawberries are consumed before a meal.”

What’s more, adding berries to sugar-sweetened foods could delay and decrease sugar spikes after a meal, according to a study published in the British Journal of Nutrition.

A glycemic index offers an indication of the potential effect a food may have on blood sugar levels.

Strawberries score low on the glycemic index, meaning they are unlikely to cause spikes in blood glucose levels.

Other foods with a low glycemic index include nuts and eggs, fatty fish, leafy greens and certain seeds such as pumpkin seeds.

Exercising also offers long-term effects on blood sugar, helping keep levels within a healthy range for periods of up to 48 hours.

Finally, drinking high volumes of sugar-free fluids can rehydrate the blood, lower blood sugar levels and reduce diabetes risk.

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